Englewood, New Jersey

The Television & Movie Wiki: for TV, celebrities, and movies.

Image:Njmap-0215.png Englewood is a city located in Bergen County, New Jersey. As of the United States 2000 Census, the city had a total population of 26,203.

Contents

Geography

Englewood is located at 40°53'36" North, 73°58'33" West (40.893343, -73.975801)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 12.8 km² (4.9 mi²). 12.7 km² (4.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.20% is water.

Demographics

City of Englewood

County of Bergen

Census
Year

Total
Population

Population
Change

Percent
Change

Total
Population

Population
Change

Percent
Change

1900

6,253 

78,441 

1910

9,924 

3,671 

58.7% 

138,002 

59,561 

75.9% 

1920

11,627 

1,703 

17.2% 

210,643 

72,641 

52.6% 

1930

17,805 

6,178 

53.1% 

364,977 

154,334 

73.3% 

1940

18,966 

1,161 

6.5% 

409,646 

44,669 

12.2% 

1950

23,145 

4,179 

22.0% 

539,139 

129,493 

31.6% 

1960

26,057 

2,912 

12.6% 

780,255 

241,116 

44.7% 

1970

24,985 

-1,072 

-4.1% 

897,148 

116,893 

15.0% 

1980

23,701 

-1,284 

-5.1% 

845,385 

-51,763 

-5.8% 

1990

24,850 

1,149 

4.8% 

825,380 

-20,005 

-2.4% 

2000

26,203 

1,353 

5.4% 

884,118 

58,738 

7.1% 

If you take account of the White, non-Hispanic population in Englewood (32%, 8,389 people), Englewood is the only place in Bergen County which has more African Americans than any other ethnic group with a 39% plurality.

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 26,203 people, 9,273 households, and 6,481 families residing in the city. The population density is 2,056.3/km² (5,322.0/mi²). There are 9,614 housing units at an average density of 754.5/km² (1,952.7/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 42.49% White, 38.98% African American, 0.27% Native American, 5.21% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 8.50% from other races, and 4.50% from two or more races. 21.76% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 9,273 households out of which 31.0% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.9% are married couples living together, 17.4% have a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% are non-families. 24.8% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.0% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.79 and the average family size is 3.29.

In the city the population is spread out with 23.9% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 37 years. For every 100 females there are 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 84.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $58,379, and the median income for a family is $67,194. Males have a median income of $41,909 versus $34,358 for females. The per capita income for the city is $35,275. 8.9% of the population and 6.6% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 10.2% of those under the age of 18 and 8.6% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

Government

Local government

Beginning in 1980, Englewood switched from a Mayor-Council form of government to a modified Council-Manager plan of government in accordance with New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law of 1950. Under this charter, the mayor retains appointive and veto powers, while the council acts as a legislative and policy making body, with some power to appoint and confirm appointments. The City Council consists of five members: four are elected from wards of roughly equal population and one additional member is elected at large. Administrative functions are responsibilities of the City Manager.

The current Mayor is Michael Wildes (term ends in 2006). The mayor is elected city-wide to a three-year term of office and has significant powers in appointing members to the Planning Board, the Library Board of Trustees, and, with council confirmation, the Board of Adjustment. The mayor serves on the Planning Board. The mayor attends and may speak at council meetings, but voting is confined only to breaking a deadlock with an affirmative vote for passage of an ordinance or resolution. The mayor has veto power over any city ordinance, but can be overridden with votes from four council members.

The City Council consists of five members, each elected for a three-year term. Four are elected from the individual wards in which they live and the other is elected by a city-wide vote as an at-large member. The city is divided into four wards which are approximately equal in population. The City Council is the legislative branch of government, whereby, deciding public policy, creating city ordinances and resolutions, passing the city budget, appropriating funds for city services, and hiring the City Manager. The City Council meets generally four times per month (except during summer months).

Members of the City Council are as follows:

  • At Large: Vernon Walton (term ends in 2006)
  • Ward 1: Douglas M. Bern (2005)
  • Ward 2: Charlotte Bennett Schoen (2007)
  • Ward 3: Scott Reddin (2005)
  • Ward 4: Jack Drakeford (2007)

Federal, state and county representation

Englewood is part of New Jersey's 37th Legislative District and is in the Ninth Congressional District.

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District, covering the southern portion of Bergen County and sections of Hudson County, is represented by Steve Rothman (D, Fair Lawn). New Jersey is represented in the Senate by Jon Corzine (D, Hoboken) and Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park).

The 37th legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Loretta Weinberg (D, Teaneck) and in the Assembly by Gordon M. Johnson (D, Englewood) and Loretta Weinberg (D, Teaneck). Weinberg was sworn into the Senate on November 10, 2005 and her Assembly vacancy will be filled by a caucus of the Bergen County Democratic Organization.

Bergen County's County Executive is Dennis McNerney. The executive, along with the Board of Chosen Freeholders administer all county business. Bergen County's Freeholders are Chairwoman Bernadette P. McPherson of Rutherford, Vice-Chairman David L. Ganz of Fair Lawn, Elizabeth Calabrese of Wallington, James M. Carroll of Demarest, Tomas J. Padilla of Park Ridge, Elizabeth Randall of Westwood and Valerie Vainieri Huttle of Englewood.

Historical note

The telephone industry made a United States "first" here with the introduction of what is known now as Direct Distance Dialing (DDD). Starting on November 10, 1951, customers of the ENglewood 3, ENglewood 4 and TEaneck 7 exchanges (who could already dial New York City and area) were able to dial 11 cities across the United States, simply by dialing the three-digit area code and the seven digit number (or the three-digit area code and the local number of two letters and five digits).

The 11 cities were Boston, Massachusetts (617), Chicago, Illinois (312), Cleveland, Ohio (216), Detroit, Michigan (313), Milwaukee, Wisconsin (414), Oakland, California (415), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (215), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (412), Providence (401), Sacramento, California (916) and San Francisco, California (318). Many other cities could not yet be included as they did not yet have the necessary switching equipment to automatically handle incoming calls on their long distance circuits. Other cities still had either a mixture of local number lengths or were all still six-digit numbers; Montreal and Toronto, Canada, for example, had a mix of six- and seven-digit numbers from 1951 to 1957, and did not have DDD until 1958. Whitehorse, Yukon, had seven-digit numbers from 1965, but the necessary switching equipment was not in place locally until 1972.

At the time, New York City's five boroughs were dialed from Englewood and Teaneck with the digits '1-1' followed by the two letters of the Exchange Name and then the remaining five digits. While New York City was assigned Area Code 212 at the very beginning of the Area Code format in October 1947, it wouldn't be until later in the 1950s when Englewood NJ would dial their calls to New York City using the digits 2-1-2. The use of the '11+' code from Englewood (and other parts of northeastern New Jersey) to call New York City had been in place for a while, even prior to 1951. New York City's five boroughs also had been dialing northeastern New Jersey as 11+ the two letters and five digits of the New Jersey number as well for a while prior to 1951 and until the later 1950s. The use of the 201 area code to call New Jersey from New York City didn't begin until the later 1950s. Englewood and Teaneck customers in 1951 didn't even know that their own area code was 201! Other cities in northeastern New Jersey, both local and toll, were dialable in 1951 (and for a few years prior) from Englewood by simply dialing the two letters of the Exchange Name and remaining five digits. In addition to New York City, the Nassau County part of Long Island was dialable from Englewood and Teaneck using area code 516; also Westchester County, Rockland County, and portions of Orange and Putnam Counties were also dialable from Englewood and Teaneck in 1951 using area code 914.

San Francisco required the special area code 318 for temporary routing requirements; later, a new device became available that allowed the central office code number dialed by the customer to be scanned to determine the proper trans-continental trunks directly to San Francisco, and the city's area code reverted to 415. The new device used metal cards similar in principle to computer punch cards, and they were rapidly scanned as they fell past a light beam. On busy days, it sounded like a machine gun firing!

Personal tools